Bakemonogatari Animation: Compensation or Creativity?

"It's not like I want to be low budget"

There is [used to be] a lot of talk up in the air about Bakemonogatari, one of SHAFT’s most popular works, directed by Akiyuki Shinbo. As most of us know, if you’re familiar with the anime he’s done, Shinbo likes to use a distinct and idiosyncratic animation style in most of if not all the anime he’s directed. The most prominent of these shows are Sayonara Zetsubou Sensei, Maria Holic, Dance in the Vampire Bund, Arakawa Under the Bridge, and Bakemonogatari, with Bakemonogatari and SZS at the top. Now, if you don’t know exactly what can define Shinbo’s directing style, it’s simply energetic, jittery, and surreal use of brief camera shots of the characters, little character movement, a lot of dialogue, stylized shots of ambiguous “art,” and shots of the surrounding environment. And for the time, around the time of SZS and Maria Holic, this style was considered unique and quirky, while others generally found it distasteful (silly them). However, ever since the release of Bakemonogatari, I’ve noticed that a lot of people are saying different.
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The Disappearance— An appearance of a visual masterpiece

Warning: This post contains explicit spoilers to The Disappearance of Suzumiya Haruhi

note: I realize that this post is extremely long winded, but there’s just so much to go over that I couldn’t help it. I apologize in advance. There are pictures, and in the later parts of the post, I began to water down my paragraphs, so I hope that helps a little.

As a movie sequel to the ever famous and beloved Suzumiya Haruhi series, Disappearance attracts a lot of attention, and receives just as much positive feedback. Suzumiya Haruhi changed the precedent of anime, and transformed the way the industry will be from the time it was released for the public, to now, and will continue to do so for more years to come. And from the  duo of chief director Tatsuya Ishihara and cinematographer Ryuuta NakagamiDisappearance is a visual masterpiece that surpasses it’s predecessor and sets the bar for all anime. Disappearance is not successful because of its plot; its plot is an above average and satisfying one that stands above others. What makes this film what it is now is it’s use of visual art on the screen.
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